Thursday, April 13, 2017

Collected Advice on Writing from Writers


One of the things I love about interviewing great authors is the advice they dispense. For wannabe writers like myself, it’s a thrill to hear how the pros do it. So, I’ve collected some tips and tricks that have appeared on this blog. I hope it helps some of y’all. It sure is beneficial to me!

Peter Brandvold:
“I really don’t have any advice other to write, read, write, read then write and read some more. Keep at it and, if it’s really what you want to do, don’t be deterred. If you’re deterred, then you really didn’t want it badly enough.”

John Hegenberger:
“Have fun! If it's not fun, it's not worth doing. If you're writing and it's not fun, maybe you shouldn't be writing.  Maybe you should be outlining.  But whatever the case, don’t let the bastards grind you down.”

Robert Randisi:
“The advice I got early in my career was to slow down. That was very bad advice.  My advice is, once you discover what your natural speed is, stick to it. Don't try to slow down, or speed up. NATURAL makes it all flow.”

Ron Fortier:
“When you write anything, better make sure you are having fun while you are at it. Because if you aren't having fun writing it, how do you expect your readers to have fun reading it?  Simple advice and one I learned to take to heart over the years. Write what you love and what excites you and most likely you'll entertain lots of other people along the way.”

C. Courtney Joyner:
“My advice: take your time.  By that, I mean to take the time you need to work on your manuscript, and know your markets.  Publishing has changed so completely in the last ten years, as we know, and there are so many avenues and chances, with e-publishing, etc. that didn’t exist before.  But don’t just throw your work out there. If you’re going to self-publish, work with an editor, then take it out.  And, with submission marketing the way it is, at least be familiar with all of the types of writing that companies are looking for.  If you sell a novel, the question might come up if it’s good for a movie sale or gaming or graphic novel.  You don’t have to be a master of all these forms, but understand them, because writers have to wear more creative and business hats than ever before, and you’ll have to make decisions based on that knowledge.”

James Reasoner:
“I'd say the answer is persistence. Get the stuff written and out there, whether it's self-publishing or submitting to traditional and small press publishers. I once read that the definition of a writer is somebody who sits in a room and types for thirty years. That's pretty much the truth, although for some of us it's been considerably longer than thirty years. During my first stint as a full-time writer, though, I just didn't work hard enough at it. That's why I had to go into the bookstore business for a while. I didn't really know any better, didn't have the self-discipline to do the amount of work necessary. Everyone has their own natural pace, of course, but I think you have to push yourself in order to find it.”

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Interview with Peter Brandvold

He goes by the name Mean Pete, but I have a secret for y'all...
He's not all that mean. In fact, he's a pretty nice guy and he was kind enough to answer some questions here on Faded Trails. Let's get right to it. Here's my interview with acclaimed and prolific author Peter Brandvold.
RF: First of all, thank you so much for agreeing to this interview. What are you currently working on, writing wise?

PB: I’m working on a series of four westerns featuring my half-breed hero Yakima Henry. The series is called BLOODY ARIZONA as is the first book. The second book, which I am just now finishing, is called WILDCAT OF THE SIERRA ESTRADA. I’m writing them under my Frank Leslie pen name.

RF: How many books have you written as of now?

PB: I lost count somewhere around 100. That includes my Longarms and Trailsmans written under pen names. So...maybe around 120 by now.

RF: What does a typical work day look like for you? Do you keep certain hours when writing? Do you try to meet a page or word count each day?

PB: I try to write 2000 words every day, and I break my day up into four chunks of 500 words each. Sometimes I write over those 500 but rarely under. I usually write 500 before 8 am. Which is when I take my wild dog out for a run. Then I write the next 500 after I get back and have breakfast. Usually another 500 after lunch, then another 500 after a nap...

RF: How many days a week do you write?

PB: Eight.

RF: When did you know you wanted to be a novelist? Also, when did you know you wanted to write westerns specifically?

PB: I knew I wanted to be a novelist or some kind of writer early on, maybe when I heard my first story. I really saw the magic in words. I probably knew I wanted to write westerns when I was watching the great western TV series of the 70s, and reading Louis L’Amour, my first favorite western writer though I’ve gone on to appreciate many more since, because there are far better ones out there.

RF: What got you interested in the western genre, be it books, television, or comics?

PB: Books and television. The first western novel I ever read was LORD GRIZZLY by Frederick Manfred, then I went on and read biographies of folks like Davy Crockett and then pulp westerns by Frank Gruber, Gordon D. Shirreffs, etc. I really fell for the pulp-style tales because they were so over the top and exciting.

RF: I know you wrote a lot of Longarm entries. How many did you scribe when it was all said and done?

PB: I wrote 30.

RF: Did you write for any other series westerns? If you can tell which ones, please do!

PB: Four Trailsman books as by Jon Sharpe.

RF: I know you’ve self-published some of your recent works. Do you like self-publishing? What are some of the benefits? What are some of the challenges?

PB: I like it because I’m my own boss and I can put up the books as fast as I can write them. On the other hand, coming from traditional publishing, I miss the advances. But my ebooks do very well, so I’m not complaining.

RF: We often hear about the demise of the western. I know several big name publishing houses recently canceled long running series. Do you think the western will ever die? Are there enough up and coming authors and readers to keep it going?

PB: The western will never die. It’s an American original and there will always be some kind of market. But all markets wax and wane. I love the western enough to ride out the ups and downs. I think there are almost too many writers out there now, and they’re somewhat muddying the western water. Too often, ebook original writers just plain do not know how to write but think they do. Readers really have to learn to discriminate so they don’t waste their time and money on some of the crap that’s getting published on Amazon right now.

RF: I know about your work in the western genre, and am a big fan! I know you’ve done some weird westerns. Are there any other genres you’ve worked in or plan to work in?

PB: I wrote a contemporary thriller called PARADOX FALLS. I thought it was pretty good but it didn’t sell very well. I think readers have pegged me as a western writer so that’s really all they want to see from me. And that’s fine with me. There’s really no other genre except possibly horror that I’d like to dabble in. I wrote a western horror, or “weird” western novel DUST OF THE DAMNED, and it has vampires and werewolves and even a dragon. Also, CANYON OF A THOUSAND EYES and its sequel NIGHT OF THE GHOST CAT.

RF: What authors have inspired you?

PB: Too many to mention. I’m a voracious reader of all genres. Well, okay, I’ll mention two wonderful western writers who’ve meant a lot to me over the years by way of inspiring me by their brilliance—Kit Prate and James Reasoner.

RF: Along those lines, if you were trying to educate someone on western fiction, who are some of the authors and what are the books you’d recommend to them?

PB: Man, that’s a tough one. Anything by Prate and Reasoner and possibly THE LONG COLD WIND by Giles Lutz, which Kit Prate recommended to me and is one of the best westerns I’ve ever read. It would be a good influence on someone just starting out.

RF: What advice do you have for wannabe writers like myself? Is there anything you wish someone would have told you when you started out?

PB: I really don’t have any advice other to write, read, write, read then write and read some more. Keep at it and, if it’s really what you want to do, don’t be deterred. If you’re deterred, then you really didn’t want it badly enough.

RF: What can we expect from Mean Pete in the future?

PB: All kinds of stuff including this Yakima Henry Quartet by my alter ego, Frank Leslie.

RF: Thank you again for taking the time to answer these questions. You’re one of the best and your books seem to just get better and better. Thanks for all the entertainment!

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Book Review: Coyote Courage by Scott Harris


The big guy, who has still not introduced himself, starts to let his hand drift down toward his low-slung pistol. Thinking he will understand, I say, “You don’t want to do that. I don’t think you’re fast enough.”
He looks again at each of his friends, who have yet to speak or move since I walked in. “Do you think you’re fast enough to take all three of us?"
I enjoy a good conversation as much as the next guy, especially after two weeks on the trail, but I am tiring of this one, so I simply say, “Yes.”

Scott Harris has written a fine western with his first novel, Coyote Courage. It’s a straight forward, tried and true western plot. That’s not a bad thing. His writing is up to the task. It figures, since Mr. Harris is an avid reader (we run around in the same online circle). The man knows his way around oaters, men’s adventure, and vintage paperbacks. It shows in the tale he crafted. There are echoes of Louis L’Amour, particularly A Man Called Noon. (I also thought I caught a hint of Jack Reacher at one point, but that may have been my imagination.)
Make no mistake, Harris has not copied anyone. Rather, it is evident he’s been inspired by the masters and it makes for an enjoyable read.
The pacing is good and the plot and action move swiftly. That is just fine by me.
I highly recommend Coyote Courage and look forward to more adventures from its hero, Brock Clemons.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

An Interview With C. Courtney Joyner

I've been excited about this interview for a while. Illness has hit my house hard recently, so I'm a bit delayed in positing. I can say this one was worth the wait!
C. Courtney Joyner is a great fiction writer. Beyond that, he's a talented filmmaker, accomplished nonfiction writer, and a whole host of other roles that are too numerous to name here. So, let's get right to the interview. Oh wait... I am happy to say Mr. Joyner has agreed to a second round once his new book, Nemo Rising, is released late this year. There are plenty of questions I did not get to this time around. The man worked with Vincent Price! That right there gives me about fifty to ask.
 He was more than gracious with his time and I'm very appreciative. A great guy and a great author. Okay...let's get to it!


Ryan Fowler: First of all, thank you so much for doing this. This has been one of my hardest interviews in that I’ve had a tough time narrowing down the questions I want to ask. You have quite a resume and a lot of points I’d like to hit. But, I’ll scale it down and only touch on a few.
I want to discuss your two western novels, Shotgun and Shotgun: The Bleeding Ground. I love these books! You took a traditional plot and gave it a new, unique hook with your hero John Bishop. Where did the inspiration for Bishop, and the story, come from?

Courtney Joyner: “The Edge” books, Franco Nero, DC comics, Elmore Leonard, ROLLING THUNDER, more comics, and my father – but, certainly, not in that order.  My father was a prominent cardiologist, and very interested in the history of medicine, and somehow we ended up with some field supplies from a Civil War medical kit, including a guide to amputations, which was the 1863 solution for pretty much every battle injury.  It was rough stuff – and he’d been an Army doc – so I’d always wanted to write about that world – but I certainly didn’t think it would be with an Army doctor who ends up with a shotgun for an arm!

The fuse for all this was lit probably 20 some-odd years ago, when I was working on a movie project with the director, John Flynn.  I loved John; he was such a talent, and a wonderful guy, and it was a true education to work on a project with him, although, unfortunately, it was never made.  But, during one of our many lunches, I mentioned I’d love to see ROLLING THUNDER done as a western, and he piped up with, “That’s great!  I’d love to do it that way!”  Nothing ever came of that, of course, but the idea – the obsessed, one-armed avenger in the West - hung in the back of my mind for a long time, even after John died, mixed in with a bunch of my other influences and enthusiasms.

I love the movies, and comics, and paperbacks. I remember my 7th grade school edition of TREASURE ISLAND was a paperback, with a great, bloody cover. Stevenson brought me to the world of classical adventure fiction, and growing up in the era of the Tarzan and Conan re-issues - with the Frank Frazetta and Neal Adams paintings – and Doc Savage, and The Exterminator, and on they go. Adventure writers - Stevenson’s distant cousins - were everywhere in paperback. I knew it was officially summer if I saw a dog-eared Mickey Spillane in my father’s hip pocket.  So, my first “adult reading” were the books I was thumbing at the spinning racks, usually with a FAMOUS MONSTERS or some Marvel comics tucked under my other arm.

Of course, in the 60’s and 70’s, westerns were going super-strong on TV and in the theaters, and Marvel and DC had their catalog of western titles.  As much as I loved RAWHIDE KID and OUTLAW KID, to me, the Marvel titles seemed more like old Republic programmers, rather than being patterned after (then) current movies like THE PROFESSIONALS or RIO CONCHOS. We all loved Jack Kirby’s living totem pole attacking THE KID, but I liked the western comics that were tougher – with a more parched feeling - which is why I was drawn to Joe Kubert’s FIREHAIR and “Weird Westerns” for JONAH HEX, and the amazing SCALPHUNTER. They hit some pretty serious topics, all framed in these wonderful action stories. Do you remember Dell’s JUDGE COLT, with those great painted covers?  Everything was always exploding at once. Great stuff. 
Also, on the paperback racks were the western movie and TV tie-ins.   I’d eventually read THE WILD BUNCH, CAHILL: U.S. MARSHAL, A TOWN CALLED BASTARD, “The Man with No Name” books by Joe Millard, and all the KUNG-FU’s, but most important for me, Elmore Leonard’s VALDEZ IS COMING.  It cost a dollar at a South Carolina grocery store, and was the first western novel I ever tackled; the movie edition, with the silhouette of Burt Lancaster on the cover, but the writing knocked me out.  Of course, this was the work of a modern master, but it was my introduction to the West on-the-page, and has stayed with me ever since.

Naturally, I was always grabbing a book with a movie slant, but started to explore, not only the titans like A.B. Guthrie, but I found George Gillman’s THE EDGE series, and loved it. Also, STEELE.  They were such fast, expert reads, and also completely captured the feeling of The Spaghetti Western, and not just Leone, but also the SARTANA series, or any of the knock-offs with Klaus Kinski. They were fun. Of course, I had no idea at the time that Gillman/Terry Harknet was British, and the icon of the Carnaby Cowboys, the writers who were churning out these westerns at a furious pace; that was all history to come. All I knew was that he could make me feel like I was watching a western while I was reading.
Somehow, that Euro influence was what I wanted to capture with SHOTGUN. That felt right to me – it was already an outrageous concept that seemed like a Spaghetti western - and I was carrying around all these enthusiasms from all of these various sources – maybe not the most elegant inspirations, but unpretentious, and fun. And, I hope I captured some of those impressions.  After the first book was published, I had a very nice correspondence with Terry Harknet, and he was very kind about the work, and it felt like being given a badge of Paperback Honor.

RF: I know you’ve done quite a bit of work in the film industry and with screenwriting. When I read Shotgun, it played very cinematically in my mind. Was that by design? Did the story start as perhaps a screenplay?

CJ: With all my love of the movies, actually SHOTGUN never was a screenplay. I think that approach just comes from my training of thinking visually for the movies. I actually tried at one point to get it done as a comic book, and then, as the first animated Spaghetti western for “Adult Swim,” and failed at both.  But, all the prep was there – treatments, story outlines, including some wonderful graphics – when Pinnacle editor Gary Goldstein first spoke to me about it.  In fact, before SHOTGUN, I’d never written a novel before, even on spec.  It all came about because the screenwriting – especially for B films and TV – started slowing down for me, crawling, and then, stopping.  I just decided to try a new direction – writing prose, and specializing in westerns.  I told my agent, and they couldn’t drop me fast enough, as this was all before the remake of TRUE GRIT, or the success of DJANGO UNCHAINED, and TEXAS RISING.  I’d actually made my way into the Western Writers of America organization, and met some remarkable writers – including some of the real titans.  I was amazed at how encouraging and patient they were with me, and put me on the road to prose, which I’d only fooled with, and never really published anything of note. Lots of articles about film, etc. but no fiction. 

Gary Goldstein was at the very first convention I attended, and he knew about some of my old horror movies and my film journalism, and we just clicked right away.  He was a big editor, so I was quite flattered when he asked me to work on a book for Citadel, DUKE, WE’RE GLAD WE KNEW YOU, and that started our relationship, but not in the world of fiction.  Spur Winning author Matthew P. Mayo helped me get me first story in print in a great anthology, FISTFUL OF LEGENDS, and that led to Gary asking me to contribute to a collection Pinnacle was putting out, called LAW OF THE GUN.  There were some huge writers in this book – Elmer Kelton, Loren D. Estleman, John Jakes – and I was thrown in with them!  That was the deep end of the pool for sure, but it showed Gary’s amazing faith, and when he was looking for a “different” western series, that would be a little less Louis L’Amour, and little more Jonah Hex, I showed him all that I’d done – and failed with – for SHOTGUN, and he responded with a contract.  Just incredible circumstances, that unfolded over a period of about six years, but, as they say, we got there.

RF: So far we’ve only seen two Bishop books. Can we look forward to more?

CJ: The third book, THESE VIOLENT TIMES, will be released in 2017, followed next year by a fourth, BULLET KISSED (!), and also the re-release of the first two SHOTGUN books in a single volume. All of these will be coming from Pinnacle in the U.S. and Random House internationally.

RF: Beyond the Shotgun series, do you have any other western novels in the works?

CJ: Nothing concrete, although after the wild world of SHOTGUN, I’d love to try my hand at something completely naturalistic, dealing with the real life of the frontier, without the shoot-outs and crazy action of my other books. It would be an enormous challenge, given my background, but the reward would be the test, and the effort.

RF: So many traditional publishers have cut their western novels. I know there are still a few being published by the “big guys.” Do you think there is a large enough fan base, and enough up and coming authors, to keep the genre alive for a while?

CJ: I really do, yes. We’ve seen the spurt of interest in the last two years, which has been quite gratifying.  What happened, when Penguin and some others decided to leave the mass market westerns behind, was that there was a sudden interest in western movies and TV mini-series.  The timing to discontinue some books was off, I think, leaving a few “big boys,” like MacMillan and Harper Collins, to take over the hardback market, while Pinnacle dominates the paperback world with the Johnstone series, etc. Of course, I don’t have sales figures in front of me, but editors say westerns are coming off the shelves – not the way they did in the paperback heydays – but the genre is on the upswing, and when shows like WESTWORLD hit, it impacts book sales even more, all of which is to the good, as readers gravitate towards westerns again, including folks who’d never sat down and read one before.  The only part of the genre that’s really been left behind are the Adult Westerns like Longarm, but that market could come back, also.

RF: I want to go back to your writing in a bit, but I’ll shift to films now. Have you ever done a western?

CJ: I have, and they all ended up as “spec doorstops.”  I wrote a biography of Belle Starr that I’m quite proud of, written as a feature that’s now been re-tooled as the pilot for a cable series called WANTED.  That piece has gotten some genuine, and serious, studio attention so it might just see production, which would be terrific.  So, I’m hopeful, as it would be my first western to go in front of the camera.

RF: Westerns seem to be popular when they are released. The Magnificent Seven remake was profitable and popular, True Grit was hugely successful, and 3:10 to Yuma did pretty well. Why are studios so weary to make more westerns?

CJ: That’s always been the contradiction – that when Westerns do well, there seems to be some odd reason for it, instead of audiences wanting the films.  Some have bombed, but so have movies of every stripe, so it’s unfair to brand westerns as movies that don’t make money because the films listed did great. It’s a tricky maneuver – getting around that thinking – but it does happen.  Unfortunately, what we are missing is a “western star,” who can shoulder the box office burden.  We’ve got some terrific actors – like Kurt Russell and Jeff Bridges – who’ve found a home in the genre, but the sure-fire star, that guarantees the cash to the studio – those days are gone, so westerns are often seen as a risk for the big screen, but as more and more perform – like THE REVENANT, MAG SEVEN - the execs are loosening up in their perceptions a bit.  At least, for now, since the movie of DEADWOOD is in development.

RF: The above mentioned films are all remakes or new adaptations of previously adapted works. Are folks just not writing new westerns or are the studios not interested? (I know we have the Tarantino films that I won’t go into here.)

CJ: I think the evidence is on the tube. Westerns have become a staple of cable TV, thanks to the enormous out-of-the-gate success of Walter Hill’s BROKEN TRAIL on AMC. That mini-series changed the network’s direction to original programming, and they haven’t looked back.  These last years, with hits like AMC’s HELL ON WHEELS, and now – a cross-over to be sure – WESTWORLD for HBO, which was DEADWOOD’s original home when cable was struggling, and a western saved it. JUSTIFIED became an instant classic of a modern western during its run on FX, and LONGMIRE’s in a new season. Also, the modern western-comedy of THE RANCH with Sam Elliott, and the adaptation of Joe Landsdale’s glorious HAP AND LEONARD.  I know those aren’t traditional westerns, but cable networks are still willing to take the risk with period epics and mini-series these part years: KLONDIKE, TEXAS-RISING, and now THE SON, starring Pierce Brosnan.  Plus, isn’t Jonah Hex now finding his way back into the DC universe?  That’s Warner Brothers, and network, so you never know where it’s going to come from!
So the westerns, and westerners, are there – maybe hiding a bit, away from the theaters – but someone’s giving westerns the green light, and they’re making money, and that’s what makes the studios pay attention. 

RF: A lot of readers on this blog are huge western fans. I have to ask, what are some of your favorite western films? Also, which new westerns have you enjoyed in the last two decades?

CJ: Favorites?  Good Lord, that would be a long list!  But some movies I return to over and over: MY DARLING CLEMENTINE, ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST, THE SHOOTIST, RIO CONCHOS, THE NAKED SPUR, RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY, HOMBRE, THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE, ULZANA’S RAID, THE OUTLAW-JOSEY WALES, NEVADA SMITH, 7 MEN FROM NOW, RED RIVER.  Those are the one right off the top of my skull – in another minute, it would be entirely different list, I’m sure. Think I could narrow it down to my top 100.

In the last two decades – that’s a lot of ground - there have been quite a few, actually.  I loved what the Cohen Brothers did with TRUE GRIT, and had a hell of a good time with the remake of 3:10. I think I’m in the majority with liking DJANGO better than HATEFUL EIGHT, and THE REVENANT was pretty amazing; visually, if nothing else. THE HOMESMAN certainly had moments, but never found its dramatic engine.  THE ASSASINATION OF JESSE JAMES, JANE GOT A GUN, FROM DUSK ‘TIL DAWN: HANGMAN’S DAUGHTER, OPEN RANGE, BLACKTHORN, THE PROPOSITION, THREE BURIALS OF MELQUIADAS ESTRADA, SERAPHIM FALLS, APPALOOSA,  and for me, the little movie that could: BONE TOMAHAWK.  Not for every taste, but I thought, a grand job.  That’s a long list, too, and I could make it longer!   

RF: Is there a particular screenplay of yours that you are most proud of? Do you have a favorite?

CJ: I’m really proud of BELLE STARR, and also a piece I wrote about boxing in the hobo jungles of the 1930’s, THE BOXCAR BOYS.  Maybe someday, we’ll see them made!  Of the movies I’ve had produced, I like a lot of my old horror films, like PRISON, and THE OFFSPRING (FROM A WHISPER TO A SCREAM), because I got to write dialog – over the top, to be sure – for Vincent Price.

RF: Do you find it easier to work on screenplays or novels?

CJ: Screenplays, just because I’ve had more practice.

RF: A complete side note here. I knew I’d chase rabbits on this interview. You did a movie with Vigo Mortensen. Wasn’t he great as Hitch in Appaloosa? He really embodied that character and I picture him and Ed Harris now when reading those novels.

CJ: Viggo is terrific, and also a terrific guy.  When he was cast in PRISON, we could tell – he’d had a small role in WITNESS – but he just leapt off the screen, and he was wonderful in that film.  He really crawls into the skins of the characters he plays.

RF: You’ve done a lot in horror. You seem to shift between horror and westerns, or whatever genre, effortlessly. Is it hard? Do you prefer one genre over the other?

CJ: I always say that horror brought me to westerns in the first place.  As a kid, I watched HIGH NOON one rainy afternoon because Lon Chaney was in it, and was hooked.  Lon also pointed me to the A.C. Lyles’ westerns, and SPRINGFIELD RIFLE. At the time, all of the Sergio Leone films were the big deal on the ABC Sunday Night Movie, so it was a wave I couldn’t escape – and didn’t want to.  So “shifting” is just following a passion. I think each genre has its own rhythms, of course, and you get into an appropriate mind-set when you’re working on something – and right now, my focus is westerns and period adventure, but if a great horror idea suddenly came to me, I’d jump right in, and shift again. Hopefully, without too much trouble.

RF: How about roles? You’ve been an author, script writer, you’ve done non-fiction, and you’ve even directed. You’ve appeared in a few films too. Is there one role you prefer or feel the most home in?

CJ: Always writing.

RF: Going back to your writing, what does a typical day look like? When you’re working, do you have a word or page threshold you try to cross each day? Do you write five days a week? Seven?

CJ: When I’m working on something – a novel or a script - I write every day – or try to, or else suffer a great case of the guilts. But I also love down-time, because that’s when some great ideas can come along.  I wish I was more consistent; some days you’re just staring ahead, with blood in your tears, trying to come up with something – and the next day you’re soaring through pages.
 
RF: Do you have any advice for new authors? Is there anything you wish someone would have told you early on in your career?

CJ: My advice: take your time.  By that, I mean to take the time you need to work on your manuscript, and know your markets.  Publishing has changed so completely in the last ten years, as we know, and there are so many avenues and chances, with e-publishing, etc. that didn’t exist before.  But don’t just throw your work out there. If you’re going to self-publish, work with an editor, then take it out.  And, with submission marketing the way it is, at least be familiar with all of the types of writing that companies are looking for.  If you sell a novel, the question might come up if it’s good for a movie sale or gaming or graphic novel.  You don’t have to be a master of all these forms, but understand them, because writers have to wear more creative and business hats than ever before, and you’ll have to make decisions based on that knowledge.

A writing career is a life-long process, not a lightning strike.  It can take decades to get to a point where you’re making enough to live on, so love what you do, in all its forms, and with luck, the other rewards will follow.
RF: What are you working on now?

CJ: I’ve done a number of commentaries on blu-rays, that have been great fun, and recently did THE CULPEPPER CATTLE CO. and Henry Hathaway’s RAWHIDE for the UK company, Signal One, and also Don Siegel’s EDGE OF ETERNITY for Twilight Time. I’m finishing up on SHOTGUN III, and have some script – and I hope – some comic book work coming up.  And this Christmas, my novel NEMO RISING will be coming out through Tor Books.  It’s my first hardback release, – and it’s a big, period adventure, so I’m very excited, and hope everyone finds it great, throw-back fun. 

Thursday, January 26, 2017

An Interview With Robert J. Randisi


Today I am beyond thrilled to present my interview with author Robert J. Randisi. It would be a gross understatement to simply say Randisi is prolific. As you’ll see, he’s a writing machine! He has one heck of a resume. Besides writing hundreds of novels (hundreds, people), he is the founder of the Private Eye Writers of America. The group awards the prestigious Shamus Award each year, honoring great detective fiction. He’s edited anthologies. He’s created numerous book series. In short, he’s one of a kind. He is also one of my literary heroes.

And, he was kind enough to answer my pesky questions. Without farther ado, here’s Robert.

Ryan: Thank you so much for agreeing to this interview. I know you are busy based upon the sheer number of books you publish! So, I’ll start with that.

Please take us through typical month for you. Do you still publish at least one book a month (I know the Gunsmith used to come out monthly and they still seem to)? How many books do you work on at one time?

Robert: I typically work on two books a month, one of which is a Gunsmith, the other varies, sometimes another Western, sometimes a Mystery. I work from 1-5 PM, have dinner, take a nap, work from 9-12, take a half hour break then work from 12:30-4 AM.  I go to bed at 5-5:30 AM, get up at noon, have breakfast and start again. Occasionally the errands of normal life--bank, post office, grocery shopping, doctor's visits--interfere.

Ryan: How many works do you have published as of now?

Robert: The nearest I can figure right now is between 640-650. 

Ryan: How long have you been a full-time writer? Did you always know that is what you wanted to do?

Robert: This month--January 2017--marks my 35th anniversary as a full-time writer.  I decided when I was 15 that I wanted to write for a living by the time I was 30, and that's what I did.

Ryan: What kind of writing schedule do you keep each day? Do you keep set hours or do you have a word threshold (5,000 words a day, etc.)?

Robert: I went into this a bit in question 1. I keep to those hours I indicated, but I try to produce 5-7 pages an hour. In my younger days my normal speed was 10 pages an hour. I'm getting older.

Ryan: Do you ever think of one day hanging it up, or will you write as long as you’re able?

Robert: There will be no retirement. I figure if I write til I'm 90 I'll be close to 1000 books. It's not something I'm aiming for. I never intended to write so many books, but it's just something I do.  It's not even a talent, it's a natural ability.

Ryan: I enjoy your westerns and your mysteries with equal measure. Do you prefer writing in one genre over the other? You can write across the two seamlessly. Has it always been that way, or was it harder in the beginning?

Robert: My preference has always been private eye novels. I've never had a problem moving back and forth between genres. The lone gunfighter and private eye have a lot in common, most notably the same kind of code.

Ryan: One thing that always strikes me about your work is the pacing. I dream of writing that way! Lean, no filler, always entertaining. How did you learn that style? Did it come naturally in the beginning? What pointers might you have for other writers regarding pacing?

Robert: Everything I do I just do. I never took a course, never practiced--DOING it IS practice. My advice to writers is always the same--SIT DOWN AND WRITE. Too much thinking gets in the way.

Ryan: I’d like to talk about westerns for a minute. I often hear that it’s a dying genre. I know many traditional publishers have outright ceased production of westerns or have scaled drastically back. Do you think there are enough new guys to keep the genre alive? Do you think there are enough readers?

Robert: I believe there's a core readership for every genre. The number fluctuates, but readers are always there. Right now traditional publishers don't believe in westerns, but we have enough small press, ebook companies and individual authors who are publishing westerns to keep the genre alive and well.

Ryan: Speaking of the traditional publishers cutting so many westerns, I was happy that you’ve continued The Gunsmith novels, finding a new home for them. Will Clint Adams remain with us for a while? Is he headed off into the sunset anytime soon?

Robert: Clint will be around as long as I am, and I'm taking steps to see that the series continues even when I'm gone-as long as people want to read about him.

Ryan: Switching to mysteries, I have to ask about your Rat Pack series. I love it! Will we see more of Frank, Sammy, and Dino in the future?

Robert: Definitely. For a while I thought I'd stop after 6, or 10, but now I think I'll keep going. Right now I'm working on one that guest stars Jackie Gleason. And Jerry Lewis is in the future.

Ryan: What advice do you have for writers? Is there anything you wish someone would have told you earlier in your career?

Robert: The advice I got early in my career was to slow down. That was very bad advice.  My advice is, once you discover what your natural speed is, stick to it. Don't try to slow down, or speed up. NATURAL makes it all flow.

Ryan: Finally, what can we expect from you this year? Any new titles you’d like to tell us about?

Robert: More Gunsmiths, a new series called Lady Gunsmith starts in March. My third hit man with a soul book is due 2/27 from Down & Out Books. I'll be doing a second Nashville private eye novel for Perfect Crime Books, a new western for Five Star Books that continues the Sons of Daniel Shaye series. And I have plans for many other books in both genres.

Ryan: Thank you again for taking the time to answer these questions. And thank you for all of the entertainment you’ve provided through the years. I’m not just blowing smoke, but you’re one of the best and certainly a favorite of mine. I really appreciate this!

Robert: It was my pleasure, Ryan. Thanks for asking.




Wednesday, January 25, 2017

An Interview with Ron Fortier


Ron Fortier is a busy guy. He has one heck of an impressive resume! Over the years, he’s worked in comics (Terminator, Green Hornet, the Incredible Hulk, Popeye, among others), written novels, and edited. Besides all of this, he is founder of Airship 27, a leading voice in the New Pulp Fiction movement. Plus, he’s an all-around nice guy and I’m pleased to present this interview with him. I’ve left my questions identified as “Q” rather than “RF” since Ron and I have the same initials. Y’all enjoy!

Ron, thank you so much for agreeing to this interview. I know you’re very busy as you’re a man who wears many hats in the publishing industry. I’ll keep it brief and we’ll get right down to it.

Q: Airship 27 seems to be the leader in publishing new pulp fiction. I guess I should start at the beginning and ask, how do you personally define “pulp fiction?”

RF: Any fast-paced action-adventure fiction that has larger than life heroes and totally evil twisted villains. Genre is unimportant, be it a crime story or pirate yarn, the pacing has to be lightning fast and never bogged down with introspection or other such boring prose. Readers want pulp to entertain them, not educate them.

Q: Have you always been interested in pulp fiction? What started your love of the genre?

RF: I got my writing start in the comics feel and over time began to understand how comics, especially in the 30s were inspired by the hero pulps of that era. Characters like the Shadow and Doc Savage would later be the molds from which such comic favorites as Batman and Superman would spring. Curious about this history, I slowly began researching the history of American pulps until in the end I was a bonefide fan.

Q: Did you know, even in childhood, that pulp would be your career? How long have you been a full-time writer?

RF: The above answer deals with some of that in that I first grew up as a dedicated comic book fan. I sold my first story in the early 70s but writing was always a part time job while I worked a 40-hour week at a local GE Factory which provided my family in regards to educating five kids and keeping them fed and insured. In 2004 I retired and then devoted my time to writing one hundred percent.

Q: You’ve worked in comics, novels, short stories, and a variety of other mediums. Do you have a favorite?

RF: Although I do love all three forms, I have to confess comic scripting is still my favorite. Prose is a solitary endeavor and though it does have its own rewards, there is nothing like working with a talented graphic artist to bring a tale to visual life. I've been blessed with working with some of the best in the business such as Gary Kato, Jeff Butler, Rob Davis and of course Alex Ross.

Q: You seem to spend a lot of time editing. Airship 27 publishes so many other authors’ work, not just your own. Would you say you spend more time writing, editing, or an equal amount of time on both?

RF: Oh yes, the Catch-22 of being an editor. With the success of Airship 27, more and more talented new writers are coming to us and in the past few years I've found myself doing lots more editing and having to push aside my own writing goals. I recently finished my fifth Captain Hazzard novel, which I had started three years ago. That's primarily because editing just took over my life. I hope to be able to balance it a bit more evenly in the future. If that is at all possible.

Q: When you’re writing, what is your process like? Do you keep set hours? Do you have a minimum word count for the day that you won’t stop until you’ve reached?

RF: I'm a free-wheeling writer as I've never been able to conform to any routine. Generally, I spend several hours editing at the start of the day. Then I'll take a break to do the normal every day errands, like grocery shopping, going out to a movie or simply sitting down to read a book. Then by late afternoon I'll get to my own writing. I tend to see stories in my imagination in scenes, one following the other in the narrative. Thus, my aim when I do write is to tackle the next scene and get it completed. Doesn't matter if it is a short or long section and once finished, I'm done for the day. I'm comfortable with building a story like this, scene by scene until I reach the end.

Q: What does the future of pulp fiction look like? Are there enough authors to keep it going?

RF: I think the future of pulp fiction is better than ever as more and more writers are discovering it. And by that, I mean young college age writers. Back in the 40s and 50s there was some kind of stigma put on populace literature. It seemed academia, for whatever highbrow reasons, labeled all pulp fiction as junk and not worthy of critical attention. But the truth was most of the famous big name authors, ala Erle Stanley Gardner, Bob Silverberg, Isaac Asimov and so many others actually had their start in the pulps. So pulps evolved into the 60s and 70s paperbacks producing such renown writers as Clive Cussler, Stephen King etc. Today, with their successes, the literary community has finally come around to recognizing the significant contributions to our culture that pulps have made and today writers don't shun the word, they are actually flattered to be known as "pulp" writers.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring pulp authors? What could you say to them that you wish someone would have told you?

RF: When you write anything, better make sure you are having fun while you are at it. Because if you aren't having fun writing it, how do you expect your readers to have fun reading it?  Simple advice and one I learned to take to heart over the years. Write what you love and what excites you and most likely you'll entertain lots of other people along the way.

Q: Finally, what are some of the upcoming titles from Airship 27 that we can look forward to?

RF: Well, it's a new year and we just kicked things off with a great western, "Comanche Blood" by R.A. Jones. We'll be following this up with a pirate adventure, "Queen of Anarchy" by Nancy Hansen and after that, a book I'm really excited about, "Holmes & Houdini" by I.A. Watson. So, as you can see, as ever, lots of great books in lots of genres. And all of them pure pulp fiction.

Ron, thank you again! You’ve always been very kind and gracious with your time. Thank you for all the entertainment you’ve given readers like me through the years. I can’t wait for Airship’s future titles!
For more information, check out Airship 27's website!

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

A Few Words on Writing

I'm no expert when it comes to writing. I'm not pretending to be. I do know what has worked for me.
I’ve started 2017 at a breakneck speed. I've written 56,000 words. I can't keep this pace up long. I don't write full-time. Not yet. I hope one day…
2016 finished really strong for me. Reviews have been good and sales even better. I’m  still in the romance game, but at least I'm having fun and making money (don’t judge; a fella does what he has to do to get a foot in the door).
A friend recently asked how I've increased my output. How am I writing at a faster pace? I told him I have no doubt the reason. It's what I believe the key to being a good writer is. I read.
An author I follow on social media recently made a comment that for a writer, all reading is research. He's a wise man.
When I read, I soak up tips and pointers from the masters without even realizing it. It sinks in through osmosis. It's as if these guys mentor me, even though I never speak to many of them.
When I read I learn sentence and paragraph structure, pacing, and story flow. I have no doubt it all shows up in my own work. When I spend time with authors who are great, I find  myself getting better than I was.
So if you want to write, my humble advice, and take it for what it's worth, is to read, read, read! Soak it all in. Enjoy the stories for what they are. Be entertained! But I promise, it will improve your own craft.
So here are a few recommendations.
Louis L’Amour was terrific. For sheer imagination, I love the guy. He could take a location and write a fun, exciting tale around it.
For pacing, I read a lot of James Reasoner! Every part of his books propel the action, moving the plot forward. Pacing is something I often struggle with. I wrote a romance following “Reasoner’s Rules” (pacing tips I've learned just by reading his work—but I like the name). It's the best reviewed and highest selling work I've ever done.
Speaking of pacing, Robert Randisi knows a thing or two, or a hundred. He writes the Gunsmith series under a pen, as well as a ton of titles under his own name. Check out his Rat Pack mystery series! Fun and fast.
And while we are talking pace, let's talk Lee Goldberg. King City is a great place to start. It's like watching an action movie.
You want to read a well-crafted action scene? Check out John Hegenberger. The man knows where it's at.
If you want to see a fine example of nonstop excitement, read Brad Thor or the late, great Vince Flynn. Those are darn good thrillers they put out.
And finally, for great first person perspective, Robert Crais’s Elvis Cole books are wonderful.
Let me know your thoughts and the writers that help you!